Press

Excerpts from Reviews, Articles, Essays

A predilection for clean design and scaled-back storytelling is evident in the work of...Jenny Lynn...she knows how to lend just the right aura of mystery to her prints and collages...that have a Wunderkammer quality...surreal, disparate images feel like they had long been swirling around in the artist’s mind until she saw their potential for storytelling.   Deborah Ross, Visual Art Source, 2016

The world is full of signs and signposts, single words that inform us of our location or direct our actions. In Jenny Lynn's short animation, she takes us on a journey through an alphabet of signs. Like a snappy slide show, It's a Sign solicits an anticipation that is humorously disrupted by an ending that is not an end.   Julien Robson, Curator of Contemporary Art, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 2009

What wonderfully strange photographs Jenny Lynn takes!   Duane Michals, 2004

Her work is reminiscent of the exquisite craft displayed by Gabriel Garcia Marquez's magical use of language, time, place, and imagination.  William Larson, 2004

A stunning anthology of visual ideas.  Ralph Gibson, 2004

Jenny Lynn creates some of the most intriguing and unsettling photographs I have seen in years...It's the strangeness quotient...that catches the eye, and holds it...the originality of Lynn's work gives strangeness a fresh frission.  Edward J. Sozanski, The Philadelphia Inquirer Art Critic, Phila. Inquirer, 2004

Jenny Lynn’s work is preternaturally aware of the correspondences, oppositions, echoes and mazes that constitute our sense of visual reality. In the tradition of the Surrealists who’ve so inspired her, however, the occasional rhymes in her photographs are invariably oblique or inexact - the equivalent of slant rhymes in a poem.  Richard Burgin, Author of The Spirit Returns, Ghost Quartet, Fear of Blue Skies, etc., and Editor of Boulevard Magazine, 1999

Her strategic and often startling interventions with scissors and drawing tools cleverly subvert and play with issues of gender, reality, and the unconscious.  Jill Snyder, Executive Director of MOCA Cleveland, and former Director of The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, from the catalogue “Beyond Narrative, The Photographs of Jenny Lynn and Jill Mathis”, 1997

What is stimulating is...she seems to have a pack of images, like tarot cards, that she shuffles to make different combinations.  William Zimmer from "Personal Styles Centered on Enigma", The New York Times, 1996

Lynn moves effortlessly from one genre to another...heightening the potential of each image as she plans its final appearance.  Rosanna Checci, from Jenny Lynn “Personal Myths” portfolio, ZOOM International magazine, 1995

When Ms. Lynn's ambitious techniques and themes mesh...her art is funny, precise, and deeply resonant, as if dream and reality had silently shaken hands and called a truce. Her art has taught me about the act of seeing and the things we see.  Richard Burgin, Author of The Spirit Returns, Ghost Quartet, and other books. Editor, Boulevard Magazine

She's a tremendous artist that in the next few years will be recognized as one of the top photographers in this country.  Michel Roux, Creator of the Absolut Vodka Campaign, from “Jenny Lynn’s Surreal World”, by Bret Senft, Photo District News, 1995

Her work is gorgeous, funny, magical. Bill Tonelli, Esquire Magazine

When you look at her work you get a feeling. You respond to it emotionally. You don't know why, but you know it's significant.  Carre Bevilacqua, Executive Director, Graphistock, from “Jenny Lynn’s Surreal World”, Photo District News, 1995

Her artwork...is very fresh...and her flexibility...she's not just a one-trick pony.
Susan Mitchell, Art Director, Vintage Books, from “Jenny Lynn Bookcovers”, Photo/Design, 1994

Inevitably, the spiral comes down to editions as small as one...Jenny Lynn, photographic artist...created the Eyewatch. Its face is one large eye, which follows its wearer, Cyclopean, wherever he or she goes. Uncharacteristically, technology functions here as a handmaiden to poetry, permitting the extension of personal whimsy and expression.   Joel Katz, Information Designer, Katz Design, from “The Many Faces of Time”, The Philadelphia Inquirer Magazine, 1994